Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson.

1 Timothy 4:13–16

Until I come, devote yourself to the public reading of Scripture, to exhortation, to teaching. 14 Do not neglect 

From the Confessions: The Defense of the Augsburg Confession

Concerning the Mass 

To begin with, we must repeat our preliminary statement that we do not abolish the Mass but religiously maintain and defend it. Mass is celebrated every Lord’s Day in our churches, and on the other festivals, when the Sacrament is offered to those who long for it after they have been examined and absolved. We observe traditional liturgical order such as the Lectionary, prayers, vestments, and similar things.

Pulling It Together

The Reformers would not sit still for the scattered blows of their opponents’ Confutation. Twisting statements into something they are not could not be permitted, if the central focus of the Reformation was to be maintained. It is easy enough for an adversary to get people to think you are something you are not, simply by spinning the truth. The fact was (and is) that Lutherans were quite similar to those whom they prayed would reform. Yet, this entire Defense shows that those who needed reforming tried to paint the Lutherans as wild heretics. Meanwhile, the Lutheran Reformers kept bringing the focus back to the main point of conflict: how God is reconciled. Our new section, “Concerning the Mass,” will show again the similarities and the one major difference between the Reformers and the Church they wished to reform.

Prayer: Bless us, O Lord, with those who teach us sound doctrine. Amen.

Receive Sola's Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

The ReClaim Hymnal for Church and Home contains three Communion Settings along with liturgies for Baptism, Confirmation, Marriage, Funerals, and other occasional services. It also includes the Small Catechism, as well as 275 beloved hymns from various hymn traditions. It is a resource that would be suitable for confirmation and graduation gifts as well as congregational use. 

Pin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pageEmail this to someone

Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Original image   •   Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson.

Luke 11:28 

From the Confessions: The Defense of the Augsburg Confession

Concerning the Marriage of Priests 

Whatever may happen, our princes will be able to have clear consciences. Even if priests had done wrong by marrying, it is surely contrary to the will and Word of God to break up marriages and issue these cruel bans. Our princes do not delight in novelty or dissent, but it is more certain that they have higher regard for the Word of God than all other things.

Pulling It Together

Cultural correctness is not an easy thing to buck. It feels like nearly everyone is against you. Yet, it is far better to have the whole world denounce you than have God condemn you. What is the clear teaching of the Word? That is God’s will. Does someone spin fine words and human reason that make you question God’s will? Go to his Word. What is written?

Prayer: Spirit of God, strengthen me to keep your Word. Amen.

Receive Sola's Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

Connections is a magazine for evangelical Lutheran Christians filled with meaty articles as well as lighter spiritual fare. Connections provides great food for the soul. Articles and features are contributed by individuals and ministries of LCMC, NALC, CALC, Lutheran Core, and other evangelical Lutherans from congregations across North America.

Pin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pageEmail this to someone

Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Original image   •   Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson.

1 Peter 1:24–25

From the Confessions: The Defense of the Augsburg Confession

Concerning the Marriage of Priests 

They defend a law that is godless and destructive to good morals with false arguments like these. With such reasons they set the minds of princes firmly against God’s judgment, who will hold them accountable for dissolving marriages, and for torturing and killing priests. Do not doubt that, as the blood of Abel cried out in death (Gen 4:10), so the blood of many good men, against whom they have unjustly raged, will also cry out. God will avenge this cruelty. Then you will discover how vacuous our opponents’ reasons are, and you will perceive that in God’s judgment, no slander against God’s Word will stand, as Isaiah says, “All flesh is grass, and all its beauty is like the flower of the field” (Isa 40:6).

Pulling It Together

Only God’s Word will abide. Our idle arguments will wither, our fine words and reasoning fall with the flowers at the end of summer. As they wither and fall, God’s glory will appear in full bloom before us. It was there all along but obscured by the high-standing hedges of our lofty intellects.

Prayer: Lord, have mercy. Amen.

Receive Sola's Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

Not My Will, But Yours is a six-week study that explores the topic of the “free will” from a biblical perspective, looking at what Scripture has to say about the bondage of the human will, and how Jesus Christ has come to deliver us from ourselves.

Pin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pageEmail this to someone

Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Original image   •   Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson.

Titus 3:5 

From the Confessions: The Defense of the Augsburg Confession

Concerning the Marriage of Priests 

The third argument is horrible, namely, that the marriage of priests is the Jovinian heresy. Fine-sounding words! This is a new crime, that marriage is a heresy! In the time of Jovinian, the world did not yet know the law concerning perpetual celibacy. Therefore, it is an impudent falsehood to say that the marriage of priests is the heresy of Jovinian, or that the Church condemned marriage at that time. We can see in such passages the design our opponents had in writing their Confutation. They determined that the unlearned would be most easily stirred up if they were to frequently hear the charge of heresy, and if they pretended that our cause had been dispatched and condemned by many previous decisions of the Church. Hence, they often falsely quote the decisions of the Church. They know this well, which is why they refused to give us a copy of their Confutation, lest their lies and slander be exposed.

We have already expressed our opinion regarding the case of Jovinian about the values of celibacy and marriage, not considering marriage and celibacy equal. Still, neither merits justification.

Pulling It Together

As stated when writing about the Distinction of Meats, Jovinian was a monk and ascetic in the fourth century who wrote against celibacy and other monastic traditions. He praised the virtues of marriage and was therefore, of course, branded a heretic. Some considered him the forerunner of Luther and the Reformers. Yet Luther and others did no go so far as to discredit celibacy and the bodily disciplines altogether. Prayer and fasting were essentials of Lutheran preaching. Even celibacy was encouraged for those who could actually embrace it. As always for the Lutherans, their disagreement was not actually in matters of marriage versus celibacy, or indulgence versus asceticism, but that these things do not merit salvation. They taught that such works cannot earn favor with God, confessing instead that God’s favor is promised to those who believe on the Lord Jesus Christ.

Prayer: Help me remember, Father, that I am your child, cleansed and reborn by your grace alone. Amen.

Receive Sola's Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

 

Combining the message of salvation in Christ with personal witness, The Gospel in Miniature is a Lutheran guide for evangelism. 

Pin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pageEmail this to someone

Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Original image   •   Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson.

1 Thessalonians 4:7–8

From the Confessions: The Defense of the Augsburg Confession

Concerning the Marriage of Priests 

When Isaiah says, “Be ye clean, that bear the vessels of the Lord,” it should be understood to mean a cleanness of heart and total repentance. Besides, the saints will know the value of restraint in the marriage bed, as Paul says about “possess[ing] his own vessel in sanctification and honor” (1 Thes 4:4, KJV). Finally, since marriage is pure, it is rightly said that those who do not practice sexual restraint should marry wives in order to be pure. Therefore, the same law, “Be ye clean, that bear the vessels of the Lord,” commands impure celibates to become pure husbands.

Pulling It Together

If one cannot in his own power do what God expects, that is, if he continues to sin, then he should do what God says is the answer. It is foolhardy to do what people say ought to be done when God has given a different solution. God has provided his system for sexual purity. To act otherwise displays either a contempt of God’s word or lunacy—or both.

Prayer: Guide my way, Lord, according to your word. Amen.

Receive Sola's Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

Views of Baptism is written for a range of readers including the parent or sponsor about to baptize a child, the adult who wants to understand baptism more fully, and the professional teacher or preacher who needs the truth about baptism stated simply but backed by careful research. This books explores three views of baptism: the individual-centered view, the means-of-grace view, and the Roman Catholic view. It includes a description of how Christian baptism came to us in stages from its Jewish roots. A question and answer section addresses specific matters often raised when people contemplate baptism.

Pin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pageEmail this to someone

Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Original image   •   Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson.

Psalm 51:7

From the Confessions: The Defense of the Augsburg Confession

Concerning the Marriage of Priests 

The second argument of our opponents is that priests should be pure, according to this sentence: “Be ye clean, that bear the vessels of the Lord” (Isa 52:11, KJV). They cite many things to this effect. We have already shown this argument to be especially false. For we have said that virginity without faith is not purity before God, while marriage is pure because of faith. “To the pure all things are pure” (Titus 1:15). We have also said that outward purity and the ceremonies of the law are not applicable here because the gospel requires purity of heart, not ceremonies of the law. It may be that the heart of a husband such as Abraham or Jacob, who were polygamists, is purer and burns less with lust than that of many virgins who are actually celibate.

Pulling It Together

What makes a sinner pure? Flagellations? Fastings? Offerings? Are these the things that King David did in order to be clean after his sin with Bathsheba? David well understood who did the cleansing. If God did not purify him and absolve him of his transgressions then he would never be clean, no matter the austerity of his religious practices. It is God alone who creates clean hearts and right spirits within us, who washes away our iniquities and cleanses us of sin. Those who imagine that they do these things have a basic misunderstanding of faith. They misconstrue in whom they are to have that faith. Perhaps without even realizing what they have done, they have placed their faith in themselves, in their religious acts. This is the dividing line of the Reformation, for, “Unless the Lord builds the house, those who build it labor in vain” (Psa 127:1). 

Prayer: Create a clean heart within me, O God. Amen.

Receive Sola's Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

Connections magazine is a voice for confessional Lutheranism in North America, featuring ministries and mission efforts of the movement. It provides reliable, Biblically based content, stories of faith, and inspirational messages all in a “coffee table quality” package that delights its subscribers. Connections has a deep commitment to the evangelical nature of Lutheranism that responds with vigor to Christ’s great commission to go and make disciples. It also gives a public center to the effort to renew Lutheranism in North America in concert with Biblical authority and the teachings of the Lutheran Confessions.

Pin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pageEmail this to someone

Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Original image   •   Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson. 

1 Corinthians 7:2

From the Confessions: The Defense of the Augsburg Confession

Concerning the Marriage of Priests 

In enumerating our arguments, we have incidentally shown our opponents’ quibbling, while at the same time, refuting their arguments. Now we shall briefly relate the earthshaking reasons they defend their law. First, they claim that it has been revealed by God. See the utter impudence of these sorry fellows! They dare to assert that the law of perpetual celibacy has been divinely revealed, even though it is contrary to obvious testimonies of Scripture, which command that each one should have his own wife in order to avoid fornication (1 Cor 7:2). Likewise, it forbids dissolution of marriages (Matt 5:32; 19:6; 1 Cor 7:27).

Paul uncovers the real author of such laws when he calls them the doctrine of demons (1 Tim 4:1). The results—namely, the magnitude of monstrous lusts and murders which are now committed under the pretext of that law—reveal the author.

Pulling It Together

This long argument against the demonic dogma of enforced and perpetual celibacy may seem to some as being overdone. Yet these very same problems persist 500 years later. Let us learn well from this lengthy denunciation how to boldly speak the plain, scriptural truth in our own time.

Prayer: Speak, Lord—even through me. Amen.

Receive Sola's Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

The goal of Personalities of Faith, a ten-session Bible study for youth, is to encourage young people to commit themselves to follow Jesus in discipleship by becoming "personalities of faith". Using biblical examples of people who have followed—or failed to follow—God's call, participants will be prepared to better follow the Lord in their own lives.

 

Pin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pageEmail this to someone

Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Original image   •   Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson. 

2 Corinthians 2:17

From the Confessions: The Defense of the Augsburg Confession

Concerning the Marriage of Priests 

We have given the reasons why we cannot conscientiously agree with our opponents’ defense of the pontifical law concerning perpetual celibacy. It conflicts with divine and natural law, is at variance even with the canons, is superstitious and full of danger, and, lastly, because the whole affair is disingenuous. The law is enacted for the sake of domination, not religion. Religion is merely a wicked pretext. No sane person would debate these firmly established reasons. For the gospel allows marriage to those to whom it is necessary, yet does not force marriage on those who want to be celibate—provided they are truly celibate. We contend that this freedom should also be granted to the priests, nor do we wish to force anyone into celibacy or to break up marriages.

Pulling It Together

The Wittenberg Reformers knew something about peddlers of religion. The hucksters of indulgences plagued the lands, bilking folks out of scarce money. There were other charlatans too, who traded wholesale in religion, exchanging false promises for the blessings of life. But the gospel that is our commission is not religion. Instead of shackles, the good news of Christ Jesus is liberty. The way of bondage leads to sin and death, while the clear call of Christ is freedom.

Prayer: When we speak, Lord, may we proclaim you. Amen.

Receive Sola's Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

The Spiritual Realms is a nine-session Bible Study series on Heaven and Hell and places beyond this world. Specifically, the study looks at the many “place names” that are found throughout Scripture, referring to spiritual realms of existence that underlie and comprise the universe God created. This Bible Study series is a challenging one, in that it explores realities of existence beyond what we know and experience everyday.

The study not only addresses matters of life, death, heaven and hell, it steadfastly affirms that Jesus Christ is at the center of all these things. Our ultimate faith and hope rest in Christ’s death and resurrection for our sake. We live in faith by the biblical promise that: “God raised the Lord, and will also raise us up by his power” (1 Cor 6:14).

Pin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pageEmail this to someone

Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Original image   •   Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson. 

1 Corinthians 11:19

From the Confessions: The Defense of the Augsburg Confession

Concerning the Marriage of Priests 

We know that because we seem to have separated from those who are considered regular bishops, some regard us as schismatic. But our consciences are quite secure. Despite our earnest desire to establish harmony, we cannot please our opponents unless we reject clear truth by agreeing with these very men in defending this unjust law to dissolve marriages that have been contracted, to put to death priests if they do not obey, and to drive poor women and fatherless children into exile. Since these conditions are most certainly displeasing to God, we can not regret having no alliance with the multitude of murderers among our adversaries.

Pulling It Together

What is one to do when all attempts have been made to reason with people who have willfully gone astray? There are people—yes, even in the churches—who willfully ignore Scripture, insisting instead on their own bent reasoning. This is the kind of reason that Luther called a “whore.” When people get in bed with that sort of thinking, they become diseased in the soul and spirit. If there are demon-possessed people among us, these are surely the ones who need a good, old fashioned casting out. Sometimes though, the best we can do is come out from among them.

Prayer: Lord, keep me true to your Word. Amen.

Receive Sola's Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

All God’s Critters is a Sunday School series designed for young students in Preschool and Kindergarten. Lessons are based on storytelling, rhyme, and pictures, and are suitable for participation by non-readers. The flexible lesson plans introduce the youngest believers to the importance and truth of God’s Word. Each lesson includes the story of the day written in a simplified manner so that young children may understand an important truth about God and what it means for us to be God’s children.

The All God’s Critters curriculum is fully reproducible and is designed with the particular needs of small churches, mission congregations, and house churches in mind. Check out some sample pages by clicking here.

Pin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPrint this pageEmail this to someone