Life Without the Trappings

Hebrews 12:14-17

About the Reformer

…I did greatly long to see some ancient godly man’s experience, who had writ some hundreds of years before I was born; for those who had writ in our days, I thought, but I desire them now to pardon me, that they had writ only that which others felt, or else had, through the strength of their wits and parts, studied to answer such objections as they perceived others were perplexed with, without going down themselves into the deep. Well, after many such longings in my mind, the God in whose hands are all our days and ways, did cast into my hand, one day, a book of Martin Luther; it was his comment on the Galatians-it also was so old that it was ready to fall piece from piece if I did but turn it over. Now I was pleased much that such an old book had fallen into my hands; the which, when I had but a little way perused, I found my condition, in his experience, so largely and profoundly handled, as if his book had been written out of my heart. This made me marvel; for thus thought I, This man could not know anything of the state of Christians now, but must needs write and speak the experience of former days.

Besides, he doth most gravely, also, in that book, debate of the rise of these temptations, namely, blasphemy, desperation, and the like; showing that the law of Moses as well as the devil, death, and hell hath a very great hand therein, the which, at first, was very strange to me; but considering and watching, I found it so indeed. But of particulars here I intend nothing; only this, methinks, I must let fall before all men, I do prefer this book of Martin Luther upon the Galatians, excepting the Holy Bible, before all the books that ever I have seen, as most fit for a wounded conscience.

—John Bunyan, Preface to Grace Abounding

Pulling It Together

Too often we simply seek the so-called good that may come our way through someone’s acceptance. This is why Esau sought the blessing of Isaac. Esau’s mistake was in longing after the material goods in his father’s blessing instead of acting as one who is already loved and accepted—as Esau was by Issac. The greater good comes when one longs for the Father’s approval, despite any earthly good. This comes only after a change of heart. Life within his loving acceptance is a blessed life even without the trappings of wealth or health.

Leave a Reply